Cutting Calories Like Crazy Won’t Get You the Body You Want

Less isn’t always more—especially when it comes to food. The ultimate proof is one woman’s Instagram transformation pics. The secret behind her “after” photo? Increasing her calories by 1,000 a day.

Madalin Frodsham, a 27-year-old woman from Perth, Australia, was following a ketogenic diet (aka a low-carb, high-fat, and moderate protein diet) and a Kayla Itsines workout plan, when she said she had hit a plateau: “After a while though, salad simply wasn’t cutting it, and for all the restrictions I was placing on my diet, I simply wasn’t seeing the results I had anticipated,” she wrote in an Instagram post.

So she decided to switch it up and talked to a personal trainer and nutrition coach. He told her to count her macronutrients and increase her carb consumption from five to 50 percent. (Pause: here’s what you need to know about counting your macronutrients and the IIFYM diet.) Frodsham kept her workout routine the same but switched up her eating style. She stayed about the same weight but saw a huge change in her physique.

Magic? Nope—it’s science. Once she upped her carb intake and started tracking her macronutrients, she was eating about 1800 calories a day. Before that? She said she was eating about 800.

Yup, you read that right. 800 calories a day.

The conventional knowledge of Weight Loss 101 might be the simple equation of “eat less than you burn,” but it’s actually more complicated than that. When you aren’t eating enough calories, your body goes into starvation mode.

In fact, it’s not recommended for women to eat fewer than 1,200 calories a day, and doing so can actually increase your risk for health problems (like gallstones and heart problems), and may lead to muscle loss and a slowing of your metabolism, as we reported in 10 Things You Don’t Know About Calories.

“When you’re following a very strict, clean diet, your body actually releases more cortisol into the blood stream, which causes your body to store fat,” says Michelle Roots, a Trainerize kinesiologist and nutrition coach. “A lot of women say, ‘I want to lose weight so I’m going to only eat 1200 calories a day and workout seven days a week,’ as opposed to looking at their macronutrients and seeing how many grams of protein and good fats they get in a day.” The result? A body that’s over-stressed and under-fed, meaning it will hold onto fat and won’t have enough energy to go hard in the gym.

Long story, short: the secret to your best body isn’t in eating less and exercising more, it’s in fueling your body and making it move.

“Don’t waste your time eating salad when you could be eating sweet potatoes and banana pancakes. Eat more and get fit. It actually works,” Frodsham wrote in her Instagram post.

Article Source: Shape.com

Video from: Health For All Women

Whenever there’s a new health revelation being shared across the vast neighborhoods of the internet, I routinely get on my knees, fold my hands in prayer, and whisper, “Please, just tell me to eat more.” Luckily, the current overlord heard my prayers when this woman shared how under-eating is bad for fitness goals, and naturally, I wept in gratitude before indulging in a basket of Popeyes chicken and biscuits. For my health, of course.

After spending years eating a strict diet of 800 calories a day (which she very carefully clarified was not an eating disorder but a carefully curated diet of health food), Australian woman Madalin Frodsham made an Instagram post documenting her recent diet changes and explained how doubling her caloric intake to 1800 calories a day has actually helped her achieve her fitness goals. Funnily enough, this is the exact same methodology I employed when I decided to increase my bagel intake from one bagel a day to five, which is rapidly pushing me towards my goal of having a booty the size of a boat.

In her viral post, Frodsham shared that while we are fed a steady diet of facts that tell us eating less is better for weight loss, it’s important to consider the ways in which eating more speeds up our metabolism and supports muscle building. This is beautiful information I will easily exploit when referring to bodega sandwiches as “metabolism accelerators.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BJ9g5gHAFcw/?taken-by=madalingiorgetta

As you can see in the before and after photos, Frodsham used to be a fit but deeply sad woman whose eyes were filled with the darkness that only preys upon people who eat 800 calories in salads a day while lightly crying, “No it’s OK, I’m full!” Her after picture shows her currently, as an even more fit woman who can now say, “Hell yeah! I’ll have a potato and then do a push-up because I’m a joyful fit human!”

As documented in her post, the move towards eating more came about after Frodsham decided to meet with a nutritional coach who instructed her to eat more of the currently maligned food group designated as carbs. She wrote:

“When he first told me to eat 50 percent carbs I nearly died. I was eating about 10 percent carbs before and could not fathom how 50 percent carbs would not make me fat. If you’re under feeding yourself in an effort to lose weight, don’t do what I did for so long. Don’t waste your time eating salad when you could be eating sweet potatoes and banana pancakes. Eat more and get fit. It actually works.”

While this is sound advice for those looking to lose weight, build muscle, and transform themselves into the muscular swan they’ve always been inside their hearts, the revelation that eating banana pancakes is more spiritually edifying than salad is something I’ve known since I popped out of my mother’s womb.

Article Source: TheFrisky.com